Individuals who are unable to work due to a medical condition may be eligible for benefits from the Social Security Administration. Benefits are available providing the individuals meets certain criteria. If you think you might qualify, please contact us.

GETTING STARTED:

  1. We will ask you a few questions over the phone to clarify your needs. Then we will schedule an initial 30-minute intake meeting.
  2. At the intake meeting, we will rule out any technical flaws that would prevent us from pursuing the case. This is unlikely, and assuming you qualify for SSD benefits, we will sign a contract to provide you counsel complete your intake form and schedule time to create your application. We will let you know exactly what you need to bring us in order to apply.
  3. Your application meeting will take 90-120 minutes, depending on how much support information you have. At the end of the meeting, our staff will file the application with the Social Security Administration on your behalf.

THE APPLICATION PROCESS:

  1. It takes roughly 3 to 5 months for your application to be initially reviewed. If it is denied, which is common, we will request an appeal for reconsideration.
  2. Reconsideration takes another 3 to 5 months. If your reconsideration is denied, we will request a hearing in front of a judge.
  3. The hearing date will likely be another 9 to 12 months in the future. We will have the strongest case possible to help ensure you are awarded the best benefit package.

FAQ:

HOW MANY APPLICATIONS GET IMMEDIATE APPROVAL? Historically, only about 18% of applications are approved at the initial stage. But don’t be discouraged. Many cases win at the hearing. It takes a while, but it is worth it to you and your loved ones.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS AND SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME BENEFITS?

Social Security Disability Insurance Benefits (abbreviated SSDI or DIB) are also known as Title 2 benefits.  Generally speaking, to be eligible for this program, you must have worked 5 out of the last 10 years and earned sufficient income to gain credits.  These credits are like paying insurance premiums. They will eventually run out after you cease employment, so it is very important to contact an attorney and begin the disability process as soon as you stop working.

Supplemental Security Insurance (abbreviated SSI or DI) are also known as Title 16 benefits.  These benefits are payable to individuals who do not have enough earned income credits to qualify for SSDI.  This program has additional technical hurdles, requiring low income and assets to qualify.

In either scenario, an individual must be able to show that he or she is unable to work due to symptoms and limitations from physical and/or mental health diagnoses.

HOW MUCH CAN I EXPECT IN BENEFITS?

For SSDI recipients, the amount of benefits each person receives depends on the amount of money paid into the system throughout their working career.

For SSI recipients, the amount of benefits begins at $750/month, but can be reduced by other types of income or assets an individual might receive.

CAN I WORK WHILE APPLYING FOR SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFITS?

Any work performed during the application process can potentially have a negative impact on the ability to get approved for benefits.  We recommend that you speak to an attorney who can properly advise you on this issue.

ARE THERE SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFITS FOR WOUNDED WARRIORS?

Yes.  In fact, the Wounded Warrior designation may help accelerate the application process.  However, in areas with a large Veteran population, this designation may not have the same effect, since there are other Wounded Warriors waiting in the same line.

CAN CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES APPLY FOR SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFITS?

Yes.  A child however, will only ever qualify for SSI benefits, as they do not have any earned income credits to qualify for SSDI.  This places an additional burden on the applicant (and his/her family) to meet the asset and income requirements of the SSI program.